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Author Topic: Demand problem  (Read 721 times)

Offline battlecast

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Demand problem
« on: April 02, 2016, 08:46:43 AM »
For some reason my flights YBBN to YWLM show 300ish per day and the reverse is 120??

Offline Sami

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    • AirwaySim - Are you the next Richard Branson?
Re: Demand problem
« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2016, 09:19:04 AM »
Demand is not necessarily the same both ways.

Offline battlecast

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Re: Demand problem
« Reply #2 on: April 02, 2016, 01:16:05 PM »
Of course but half the demand ?

I'm being flagged by the system for over supplying the return flight and I'm not sure how to fix that

Offline scotscrew

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Re: Demand problem
« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2016, 02:49:54 PM »
I agree, demand seems extremely low for that era. Example LGW/EWR 260 per day seems very low foer the 90's

Offline ChuckPerry

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Re: Demand problem
« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2016, 01:57:07 AM »
Pax demand does seem unrealistically low for 1993... MCO-ATL < 600 pax a day?  Delta alone was running L1011's ever hour and filling them up!

Offline 11Air

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Re: Demand problem
« Reply #5 on: April 18, 2016, 08:55:40 AM »
Might have been better for a short Beta game to keep demand and fuel prices stable while we players work out what does or doesn't work.
So far I've decided that I can still play the normal games by largely ignoring cargo as it will take care of itself, and Pax pay better so getting that right will be what makes a strong airline.
I haven't done any research like Sami has, but the cargo revenue seems very low when we know cargo only aircraft, even airlines, operate profitably on Charter and Scheduled runs, but we don't have the more profitable 'palleted' cargo's that are the cost effective cargo for those bulk carriers.  There are also real world issues of 'Contracts' and 'Penalty Clauses' for non-delivery of the service, what ever the cause is.  Perhaps some aspects of real world are not worth modelling or playing.
Generally 'Cargo' will fill a gap in the realism of the game but it's not going to be a major factor in profits, though it will be a part of the management.  it will be interesting to see how this exercise affects Sami's final pricing structures etc.  It is playing well so far, but isn't a major factor in game play as is.

Offline fark24

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Re: Demand problem
« Reply #6 on: April 18, 2016, 07:09:32 PM »
it will be interesting to see how this exercise affects Sami's final pricing structures etc.

Especially as I understand the current passenger preference for larger aircraft is a de-facto way of simulating profits from cargo.

I wonder if passenger preference will go back to being independent of the gauge of the aircraft once cargo is in play. If not, I could see it really nerfing small/medium sized aircraft.

Offline ChuckPerry

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Re: Demand problem
« Reply #7 on: April 19, 2016, 01:30:00 AM »
Isn't there a city-pair pax demand database that all the games can reference in AirwaySim?  I mean Pax demand should be the same on January 1, 1997 from ATL to LAX  REGARDLESS of which game world you're playing in to be realistic...

Offline 11Air

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Re: Demand problem
« Reply #8 on: April 19, 2016, 03:52:59 PM »
The cargo demand will, but isn't in this beta game, going to be based on a City Demand model that will then be the basis for a City Based Pax Demand in future games. 
There is little said as yet as to how heavy cargo (palletised loads for example) will be allocated in aircraft that don't have the big cargo doors, I suspect they won't be doing heavy Cargo though there is quite a bit of one way fruit and veg traffic from the Med to UK and central Europe in the summer times.  The present system of Blocking Seats allows them to be filled with Postal bags (light cargo) while medium cargo is carried below the passenger deck on medium sized aircraft.
It will be interesting to see if Race Events (horse or racing/rally cars) will appear as one-off load peaks to be carried within a couple of days before the cut-off date.  Even more interesting if the airlines based at source airport get fined for not providing the service. 
There are other fluctuating Pax demands, an example would be Southampton and it's busy alternate Pax load for the cruise liners. that would also occur at the major Cruise Stop-Overs Ports.  A step into the Charter Airliner market that might follow later on I suppose.

 

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