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Author Topic: Drop in demand???  (Read 686 times)

Offline Balfoursfinest

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Drop in demand???
« on: May 23, 2014, 08:18:36 PM »
Anyone noticed that demand seems to have dropped across the board over the last few game months? 

Thought it was just me forgetting to rotate a/c to cover big exams, then realised that other (bigger) airlines passengers carried has taken a hit at the same time.

Seemed to happen about wk 36 onwards.

Something happened that I have missed??

Cheers

BF

Online schro

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Re: Drop in demand???
« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2014, 08:36:11 PM »
Check out the thread title (and body of the thread) directly below yours ;-)

http://www.airwaysim.com/forum/index.php/topic,53728.0.html

Offline Balfoursfinest

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Re: Drop in demand???
« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2014, 09:00:33 PM »
Read (or mis-read maybe!) that thread and took it that 9/11 had not been modelled in the sim, hence the question.

Whereas, it had been included, but was not an "event".... :-[

Looked at the drop in demand and thought that's due to 9/11....but then mis-interpreted the thread and thought what else has happened....DOH...


Ah well, back to trying the bk my airline...

Offline Karl

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Re: Drop in demand???
« Reply #3 on: May 24, 2014, 12:26:53 AM »
Whatever the cause, the demand did drop. 

I noticed that in some smaller markets there is no longer enough demand to economically support two flights (my own or mine plus a competitor) per day in markets that used to have such demand.  I found the drop significant enough to spend time reducing flights. 

Offline CUR$E - God of AirwaySim

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Re: Drop in demand???
« Reply #4 on: May 24, 2014, 03:17:07 AM »
The cause is 9/11 and it's a not ingame announced event, as is was at least for 5 years now.

Offline knobbygb

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Re: Drop in demand???
« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2014, 05:08:28 PM »
Quote
I noticed that in some smaller markets there is no longer enough demand to economically support two flights (my own or mine plus a competitor) per day in markets that used to have such demand.  I found the drop significant enough to spend time reducing flights.

I've noticed pretty much 20% drop across the board although it has picked up again over the last few weeks.  I wonder - was the drop as severe outside the US? It was quite an eye opener how such a relatively "small" drop made my airline go from $70M per week profit to loss making. It certainly made me tighten my belt a little and do some "housework" I'd been meaning to do for a while but I didn't cancel any flights really.  A few routes became marginal enough to generate oversupply warnings which kinda jolted me into wondering what I'd done wrong.

Offline 11Air

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Re: Drop in demand???
« Reply #6 on: June 08, 2014, 11:10:25 AM »
My wife was doing social support at Heathrow in those days, 9/11 had a huge impact with so many planes grounded and all routes to USofA 'not allowed'. LHR being a gateway airport had many Americans and others in transit to the US. We were also swamped with offers of accommodation from all over the country. The towers collapsed it was mid-afternoon UK, a huge event in the UK too. There was little we could do for you in America, but all those in Transit were going to be helped, somehow. In the airport the social team quickly had Counselling available to all. There was little information available at that time but what we had was passed on. The local town councils opened up what facilities they had and bussed everyone in so they got a meal while overnight arrangements were made and the towns social workers took over there.
In the airport we (I was there to help) were rounding up any passengers still there. I remember one chap in the orange religious robes, looking rather bewildered and with no English. The Social Team were able to help him through the usual interpreters that are available at the airport.
British Airways and the Heathrow management put up huge tents for day time use as people tried to get home some how.
From the airlines point of view the aircraft were now all out of position, or just grounded in America. This affected more passengers of course, but not so badly. I think the US no-fly ban lasted three days, as I remember, which meant 3 days of passengers looking for their flights on top of the already well subscribed passengers numbers every day adding to the queue. Our dependence on Air to cross the atlantic became very clear, yet we've made no changes. No Liners, as in the old days, to keep the lines open. The armed forces are just not equipped for shipping civilians in comfort, and no-one keeps airliners in store to provide additional capacity.

The Icelandic Dust Cloud affected Europe badly. Technically the dust in the engines melted into a polluted glass like product which stuck in a thin film to the blades. Not a problem until the engine cooled down and the glass set. The additional maintenance was the real issue for operators, costing and cutting aircraft availability. What actual damage was being caused was not known, but safety came first so few aircraft flew. Now we have dust radar, on board monitoring, and a better understanding of the maintenance issues. But that Icelandic eruption was 'small' in geographers terminology. Just hope Sami doesn't throw another one in, some where in the world!

 

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