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Author Topic: Oversupplying a route  (Read 1637 times)

dubAUT

  • Former member
Oversupplying a route
« on: April 06, 2010, 04:51:31 PM »
Since there is the rule that you are not allowd to oversupply, I don't think that's fair, if some airlines have bseudo-hubs by oversupplying the routs between their HQ and another airport, for example as King Airways does between PMI and BCN: There is a maximum demand of about 350 pax, but there are suppied 16,500+.

Am I rowng or took this roule not place in Euro Challenge #2?

Kontio

  • Former member
Re: Oversupplying a route
« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2010, 04:55:26 PM »
I believe the route between the primary and secondary hubs is an exception to the rule.

Offline CUR$E - God of AirwaySim

  • Members
  • Posts: 4028
Re: Oversupplying a route
« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2010, 05:59:25 PM »
That's right, Kontio. I also set high prices on the two hub routes (Palma-Barcelona, Palma-Madrid) for extra declaring this as hub-routes and no regular flown routes.


http://www.airwaysim.com/game/Manual/General/Rules/#Competition

"Note: With version 1.11 game engine (March 2010) the exception to this rule is when airline is repositioning aircraft to other airport and flying from the other airport onwards to a third destination. This exception will be removed in games with version 1.2 game engine and after that the rule will explicitly concern all routes."


Edit: It's not my intention to destroy small airlines. So if sometimes anybody has a big problem with one of my routes, feel free to talk to me. But as the route to Malta is served by Baleria (and there are no routes from Barcelona/Madrid to Malta at my side), I'm sure this hasn't happen in this case.
« Last Edit: April 06, 2010, 06:02:30 PM by Curse »

dubAUT

  • Former member
Re: Oversupplying a route
« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2010, 06:29:51 PM »
Edit: It's not my intention to destroy small airlines. So if sometimes anybody has a big problem with one of my routes, feel free to talk to me. But as the route to Malta is served by Baleria (and there are no routes from Barcelona/Madrid to Malta at my side), I'm sure this hasn't happen in this case.

Sorry, I lost this point in the rules. I just asked because I would like to provide some service torwards one airport where the demand out from MLA is not that high and for that reason I didn't yet like that. So I feel free to copy that strategie ;-)

What have you done with the prices, Curse?

Offline CUR$E - God of AirwaySim

  • Members
  • Posts: 4028
Re: Oversupplying a route
« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2010, 06:44:51 PM »
If you fly a route normally, you'll set prices like standard, standard minus 20% or something like that. I set the prices on the routes to the hubs +xx% (don't know exactly and it's not necessary to the rules).

One small hint: Get sure you make good money with your hub. It's not only wasting fuel to fly there, you waste lots of time to get there, turn-around etc.

L1011fan

  • Former member
Re: Oversupplying a route
« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2010, 10:36:58 PM »
When I was a travel agent, fares between hubs were among the highest! For example, AA would price ORD-DFW around $900 in Y class back in the day, while TWA might flyit for $269 Y if you didn't mind changing planes at STL. We had some very sneaky ways around it at the time then the carriers came up with ways to catch us and preclude us from getting a cheaper nonstop between hubs. We would book ORD-DFW-SAT as a one way and write one ticket for that at about $239, and then pax would just not show up for the 2nd leg. It got trickier on the return though, because ticket counter personnel were getting hip the carry-on luggage. Finally software came out detect this practice (called "hidden city" ticketing) and we had to stop doing it or risk the agency being charged for the remainder of the correct fare. The agency was always responsible for those actions and making sure the correct, published fare was used for the route. (By the way, these were all "walk-up" fares  I'm talkin about).

 

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